Project #122053 - Shaping the United States.

Essay Question: Were ideological or material interests more important in shaping the United States in the years before 1865? Answer this question in 3 pages using evidence that supports your position.

 

((READ ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS))

 

number of factors that have shaped the development of the United States from a collection of British Colonies into an independent and united political entity. The factors at work in this process can be grouped into two general categories: those driven by ideological interests (religious, political, and other types of beliefs) and those driven by material interests (wealth, land acquisition, etc). While both types of interests were important in these years, you must answer with a thesis that makes clear which type of interests were most important? Pick one or the other and argue for that position. Again, make sure to use plenty of evidence from the attached readings only. (((No outside sources)))

 

You must use these readings to back up the argument/thesis with plenty of evidence that supports your position. 

 

 

Required Guidelines:

 

-The paper must have a title page that includes your name, course, and section number, and the semester. 

 

-The paper must be in 12 point Times New Roman font with 1.25” margins at left and right and 1” margins at top an bottom.

 

 

-No lengthy direct quotations. Only directly quote sources when doing so is absolutely necessary to get your point across, and don’t quote more than a few essential words. 

 

 

Things to consider when writing:

 

-The sources attached fall into two categories: primary sources and secondary sources. Primary sources include speeches, journal entries, newspaper articles, and anything else that comes from the historical period in question. Secondary sources are those produced afterward by people who are interpreting these primary sources. For example, George Washington’s Farewell Speech is a primary source. Foner’s Give Me Liberty is a secondary source.

 

-Who produced a source matters. Always take this into account when using sources for the paper. An extreme example: if Chris Rock says a bullet should cost five thousand dollars, people laugh; if the President says a bullet should cost five thousand dollars, people get mad. So make sure you’re clear about who it is that you’re citing on a particular issue.

 

-The question is not about “today.” Don’t wax on about how these years affected America “today.” The question is about the period leading up to the Civil War.

 

-Don’t ramble on about a vague issue. You should be leading through evidence.

 

-Write formally and don’t use the first person in your paper.

 

Citation Guide:

 

You don’t need a works cited page, so you’ll only need to cite your sources in your end notes (remember- not foot notes; not in-text citations). Inserting end-notes into the paper is different on various programs and operating systems. At the end of the entire paper where your endnotes should be.

 

 

Now here’s what the citations in your footnotes should look like!

 

For published sources and websites, use the following format:

 

Book with one author:

 

Author name (first, last), Title of Book (Publisher, Date), page number.

 

Example: Ira Katznelson, When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America (W.W. Norton & Company, 2005) 114.

 

 

Article/chapter in an edited collection:

Author name (first, last), “Title,” in Collection Title, ed. Editor Name (Publisher, Year) page number.

 

Example: John Kenneth Galbraith, “The Crash,” in The Essential Galbraith

ed. Andrea D. Williams (Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001) 276.

 

 

Newspaper Article

 

Author, “Article Title,” Source, date, page number. (or date accessed, website. in place of page number if found online).

 

Example: Erika Schickel, “Pilgrims’ Sermons Echo in Sarah Vowell’s Ears,” LA Times, November 2, 2008, accessed November 14, 2014, http://articles.latimes.com/2008/nov/02/entertainment/ca-sarah-vowell2.

 

Website

Author (if available), “Page Title,” Website Title, date accessed, website.

 

Example: “Hot Off the Presses,” American Experience, PBS, accessed November 14, 2014, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dday/sfeature/sf_press.html

 

 

Course Primary Sources:

 

Author (if available), Document Title, Date (date accessed, website if source is online)

 

Example: Martin Luther King Jr. “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” August 1963.

 

Video:

“Video Title,” date created, time rounded to nearest minute, (date last accessed, website if online).

 

Example: “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara,” 2003, 55:00.

 

 The readings on these following links are the only ones you can take information and evidence from:

Essay Question: Were ideological or material interests more important in shaping the United States in the years before 1865? Answer this question in 3 pages using evidence that supports your position.

 

((READ ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS))

 

number of factors that have shaped the development of the United States from a collection of British Colonies into an independent and united political entity. The factors at work in this process can be grouped into two general categories: those driven by ideological interests (religious, political, and other types of beliefs) and those driven by material interests (wealth, land acquisition, etc). While both types of interests were important in these years, you must answer with a thesis that makes clear which type of interests were most important? Pick one or the other and argue for that position. Again, make sure to use plenty of evidence from the attached readings only. (((No outside sources)))

 

You must use these readings to back up the argument/thesis with plenty of evidence that supports your position. 

 

 

Required Guidelines:

 

-The paper must have a title page that includes your name, course, and section number, and the semester. 

 

-The paper must be in 12 point Times New Roman font with 1.25” margins at left and right and 1” margins at top an bottom.

 

 

-No lengthy direct quotations. Only directly quote sources when doing so is absolutely necessary to get your point across, and don’t quote more than a few essential words. 

 

 

Things to consider when writing:

 

-The sources attached fall into two categories: primary sources and secondary sources. Primary sources include speeches, journal entries, newspaper articles, and anything else that comes from the historical period in question. Secondary sources are those produced afterward by people who are interpreting these primary sources. For example, George Washington’s Farewell Speech is a primary source. Foner’s Give Me Liberty is a secondary source.

 

-Who produced a source matters. Always take this into account when using sources for the paper. An extreme example: if Chris Rock says a bullet should cost five thousand dollars, people laugh; if the President says a bullet should cost five thousand dollars, people get mad. So make sure you’re clear about who it is that you’re citing on a particular issue.

 

-The question is not about “today.” Don’t wax on about how these years affected America “today.” The question is about the period leading up to the Civil War.

 

-Don’t ramble on about a vague issue. You should be leading through evidence.

 

-Write formally and don’t use the first person in your paper.

 

Citation Guide:

 

You don’t need a works cited page, so you’ll only need to cite your sources in your end notes (remember- not foot notes; not in-text citations). Inserting end-notes into the paper is different on various programs and operating systems. At the end of the entire paper where your endnotes should be.

 

 

Now here’s what the citations in your footnotes should look like!

 

For published sources and websites, use the following format:

 

Book with one author:

 

Author name (first, last), Title of Book (Publisher, Date), page number.

 

Example: Ira Katznelson, When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America (W.W. Norton & Company, 2005) 114.

 

 

Article/chapter in an edited collection:

Author name (first, last), “Title,” in Collection Title, ed. Editor Name (Publisher, Year) page number.

 

Example: John Kenneth Galbraith, “The Crash,” in The Essential Galbraith

ed. Andrea D. Williams (Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001) 276.

 

 

Newspaper Article

 

Author, “Article Title,” Source, date, page number. (or date accessed, website. in place of page number if found online).

 

Example: Erika Schickel, “Pilgrims’ Sermons Echo in Sarah Vowell’s Ears,” LA Times, November 2, 2008, accessed November 14, 2014, http://articles.latimes.com/2008/nov/02/entertainment/ca-sarah-vowell2.

 

Website

Author (if available), “Page Title,” Website Title, date accessed, website.

 

Example: “Hot Off the Presses,” American Experience, PBS, accessed November 14, 2014, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dday/sfeature/sf_press.html

 

 

Course Primary Sources:

 

Author (if available), Document Title, Date (date accessed, website if source is online)

 

Example: Martin Luther King Jr. “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” August 1963.

 

Video:

“Video Title,” date created, time rounded to nearest minute, (date last accessed, website if online).

 

Example: “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara,” 2003, 55:00.

 I will send the readings in links and they are the only ones you can take information and evidence from to support the essay.

Subject History
Due By (Pacific Time) 04/19/2016 10:00 am
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